PS - Carmel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carmel is a city in Hamilton County, Indiana, located immediately north of Indianapolis, Indiana. The population was 79,191 at the 2010 census, and it is consistently ranked, alongside Zionsville and Fishers, as one of the most affluent suburbs in the Indianapolis area

A $24.5 million water park and mega-fitness center is the center piece of Carmel’s $55 million Central Park which opened in 2007 . The Outdoor Water Park consists of two water slides, a drop slide, a diving board, a lazy river, a kiddie pool, a large zero depth activity pool, Flowrider and a lap pool. The state-of-the-art fitness center consists of an indoor lap pool, a recreation pool with its own set of water slides and a snack bar, gymnasium, 1/8 mile indoor running track, and the Kids Zone childcare. The Center also has an adjoining building connected by an elevated walkway over the Monon Trail, where the Carmel Clay Parks Department offices are located.

The Monon Trail is a bicycle trail that is part of the Rails-to-Trails movement. It runs from 10th near downtown Indianapolis through Broad Ripple and then crosses into Carmel at 96th Street and continues north through 146th Street into Westfield. In the future, it is planned to run all the way to Sheridan. In January 2006 speed limit signs of 15 to 20 mph have been added to sections of the trail north of 96th Street which is the county line with Marion County (Indianapolis.)

The Carmel Arts & Design District dedicated to the arts in Old Town Carmel. Designed to promote small businesses and local artisans, Carmel’s burgeoning Arts and Design District and City Center have become one of central Indiana’s most luring attractions for residents and visitors. Centered at the intersection of Main Street and Range Line Road in Old Town Carmel and flanked by Carmel High School on the east and the Monon Greenway on the west, the Carmel Arts and Design District includes the award winning Carmel Clay Public Library,[18] the Hamilton County Convention & Visitor’s Bureau and Welcome Center and a prodigious collection of art galleries, boutiques, interior designers, cafes and restaurants. Lifelike sculptures by John Seward Johnson II, “The Normal Rockwell of American Sculpture”, ornament the streets of the District.